Games in the Foreign Language Classroom

Instructions for the Games


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Vocabulary Review and Practice

  1. 1-2-3-4 Whiteboards
  2. Alphabet Game
  3. Bingo
  4. Charades
  5. Concentration/Memory
  6. Flyswatter Game
  7. Fruit Salad
  8. Guess Who
  9. Hangman
  10. Happy Face
  11. Hold It Up
  12. I have__, Who has__?
  13. Listen and Draw
  14. Listen and Show
  15. Name Games
  16. Pass the Bag
  17. Pass the Board
  18. Password/Taboo
  19. Le Pauvre/Pobrecito/99
  20. Pictionary
  21. Scattergories
  22. Snake Game
  23. Snap and Clap Game
  24. Spelling Bee style
  25. Scavenger Hunts
  26. Simon Says
  27. Spoons
  28. TPR movement with vocabulary

Grammar & Verb Conjugations Games

  1. Battleship
  2. Conjugation Game
  3. Conjugation Scramble
  4. Dice game with verbs
  5. Oral conjugation practice
  6. Pronoun and verb card practice
  7. Verb conjugation Relay Race #1
  8. Verb conjugation Relay Race #2
  9. Verb Conjugation Timed Race
  10. Verb tic-tac-toe

Review and General Games

  1. Baseball
  2. Basketball
  3. Bomb Game
  4. Family Feud
  5. Jeopardy
  6. Speed Scrabble
  7. Spin the Bottle
  8. Stump the Chumps

Authentic Game

  1. Pétanque/Boules

Vocabulary Review And Practice Games


1-2-3-4 Whiteboards
• I have 6 rows of students and there are 4 students in each row. Each row is a team (6 teams of 4 students). The first person in each row is #1, the second #2 etc.
• I give a vocab word or subject& verb in English and everyone writes the TL word or verb form on their whiteboard.
• I roll the die and call out the number (in my class only 1-4). If I call "2", the 2s from each team hold up their whiteboards and get a point if it's right. If one row has only 3 students, the students take turns being #4.

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Alphabet Game
• Ahead of time, prepare a list of words (usually five letters or longer) in the TL in which no letters repeat, for instance, in English 'plane' (but not 'automobile'—there are two O's).
• Write the alphabet on the board in large caps, (adapted for your language—put the common accented letters after 'Z'). Write them in columns on a transparency.           
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z Ç
é è à î ô ë
• Place a clean transparency over top of the one with the alphabet on it.                       
• Divide the class into two teams.
• One member of Team A (The “Vanna” student) comes to the overhead and draws one of the words from my list, but does not say it out loud or mouth it. He/she takes a marker.
• The other members of Team A then take turns naming a letter of the alphabet in the TL.
• If the letter a student names is one in the word, “Vanna” circles that letter. If it isn't, then the student makes an "x" through the letter. (He/she is marking on the top sheet)
• I set a time of 3 minutes for each round. I use a kitchen timer to keep track of the time. Team A members may make as many attempts at guessing the word as they want as letters get progressively circled or "x'd" out. Students at their seats may NOT use pencil & paper to write the letters down & try to figure out the word (I make them clear their desks of everything before we start). If a team cannot guess the correct word at the end of 3 minutes, the other team may make one guess and gets a point if they identify the word correctly. Also, “Vanna” may not talk at all! When students call out guesses, I tell them whether the guess is correct or not.
• If all the letters in the word have been circled, but there are still alphabet letters left to be called and time left, “Vanna” may not indicate that all the correct letters have been called. The game continues until time is up or the word is guessed within the time limit.
• At the end of a round, take off the top overhead sheet and place another clean sheet on top for the next round. Bring up a “Vanna” from team B.

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Bingo
• Student boards should have the target language (TL) or pictures. Teacher (or a student) calls out words in English (if student boards have TL words) or TL (if boards have pictures).
• If student has five in a row marked, he/she calls “Bingo.” To verify, have neighboring students check the board as the student says the words in both languages. If verified, student wins that round. (I usually allow two winners per round).
• If multiple students have rows completed at the same time, the first to call “Bingo” is the winner (if verified).
• Variation—have students put boards in sleeve protectors and mark the squares with a dry-erase marker.
• I keep bingo chips in film canisters to speed passing them out and collecting them.
• I use binder clips & paper clips to keep sets of boards & the call-out cards together in my files
Create Your Own Bingo
• Instruct students to write down one vocabulary word on a half sheet of paper. Inform them that all students must have a different word.
• Students bring their word to the teacher in the front of the room one by one. If you receive a duplicate word by a student, send them back to their seat to find another word.
• After the students give their word to the teacher, they are to go back to their seats and write their word in one space in the bingo board, spelling the word correctly.
• When all students have turned in a word, instruct students to fill their bingo boards with other students’ words (or write “their” word on random spaces on other students’ boards)
• Teacher then calls the bingo game by using the half sheets of paper the students turned in.
• Bingo then proceeds as above (or whatever the class norm is)

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Charades.
• Students act out vocabulary items. No talking or sound effects. Their team tries to guess it. If they can’t get it after a preset time limit, the other team gets one guess.
• Teams must guess in the TL, any English and team loses their turn

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Concentration/Memory
• Have the students make a set of cards with the English for each vocabulary word on one card and the TL word on another.
• Shuffle the cards and lay them out face down in a grid.
• Students take turns turning over two cards. If they are a matching set (English to target) they get to keep the cards and take another turn. If not, the cards are turned back over and the other player takes a turn.

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Flyswatter game
• Prepare one or more overheads with the target vocabulary (I usually use pictures from clip art, but you could also use English words I suppose). You can also use flashcards stuck to the board with magnets, or write vocabulary words on the board.
• The class is divided into two teams.
• The first student in each team is given a flyswatter. They stand up next to a stool in the front of the room, looking at the board/screen.
• The teacher calls out a word.
• The students may not move away from the stool until they locate the correct item, which they then go “swat” with their flyswatter.
• The first student to swat the correct picture wins a point for his/her team.
• If contested, the flyswatter on the bottom wins.
• I only allow one swat per player, so if one player hits an incorrect answer, the other player can take his/her time selecting an answer.
• If neither player knows the answer, the whole class identifies the answer
• The two students return to the end of their team’s line.
• I subtract five points if a player touches another person with the flyswatter. I also stop the game if the students hit too hard, or if the lines are getting restless.
Variation: desktop partner version:
• Students pair up and place their desks facing each other. The paper with the pictures is placed in the middle.
• When the teacher says the word, students put their finger (or a sponge paintbrush) on the correct answer. Some teachers give them each a different color crayon or marker to mark the answer. The first student gets a point. If they don’t agree who got there first, neither gets a point.
• The advantage is that all students are on-task for every item.
Grab-it (a variation with no fly-swatter)
• Use flashcards of vocabulary laid out on the board or between pairs at desks.
• You call out vocab item.
• First student to touch/grab/hit/snatch the correct card gets to take it. In case of a tie (or an argument over who was first), the card is set aside—nobody gets it.
• Student or team with the most cards at the end wins.

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Fruit Salad
• The game has many popular variations and may also be called Paintbox, Tornado, etc.
• Assign each student one word out of a set of four or five.
• Arrange the seats in a circle, with one fewer than the number of students in the class.
• The leftover student stands in the middle. He/She calls out a word.
• All the students who have that word must change seats. They must get up and scramble for a new seat. They may not sit in the same seat they just left. The student who was in the middle is also trying to get a seat.
• Whoever is left standing continues the game by calling a different word.
• The player in the middle can also call “Fruit Salad” in which case everybody has to scramble.
• The game involves lots of movement, and must be monitored so it doesn’t become rough.
• It could also be played based on clothing (everyone wearing “white shoes” or “blue shirts” must scramble, etc.) or other categories.

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Guess Who (for descriptive practice)
• Copy and paste 30 male faces (all races, ages, appearances, etc...) and under each face write a target language first name. Then do the same thing on another document for 30 female faces. Print out 15 color copies of each. Have a color transparency made of each.
• First, practice with the class using the pics on the overhead and describing men or women and they have to guess who it is. Then, they describe a few and you have to guess who it is. Then pair them up and each 2 kids get a matching printout (either the men page or the women page) and they have to ask YES/NO questions only in the target language to try to figure out which is their opponent's secret person (like in the board game)
• If you put it in a page protector, they can use a dry-erase marker to eliminate anyone who doesn't fit their yes/no criteria. (Ex: Is he blond? Does he have big ears?, etc..)

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Hangman – a classic way to practice the alphabet and vocabulary
• On the board or on an overhead, write out blanks representing the number of letters in a vocabulary word.
• Have the students take turns guessing a letter (in the TL). If the letter is in the word, write it in the appropriate blank(s). If the letter is not in the word, draw the next piece of the hanged man (1-head, 2-torso, 3-arm, 4-arm, 5-leg, 6-leg).
• If they guess the word before the drawing is done, they win. If not, you win.
• For an alternative, build a different picture. For example in the winter make a "snowperson." So it is exact same idea as "Hangman" only instead of drawing a person hanging draw a snowperson (3 snowballs, eyes, nose, arms, hat, etc.). (In October, draw a spider—the body and all 8 legs). Just like in “Hangman" they try to solve the puzzle before my picture is complete.
• Another variant is a team “race” based on the principle of the Hangman game. Two racers race to the finish line. Get a letter right, your player moves forward. Get a letter wrong, the opponent runner(s) moves forward. First to finish line wins. The distance traversed is based on number of letters in the message so that you do not reach the finish line until the message was completely solved. (I use the little “magnet men” to race across the board. Multiple teams can play, with different colored “men”)

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Happy Face – a flash card variation
• A small number of flash cards are used. They could be vocabulary pictures or numbers, ...
• The entire set is practiced with the entire class once or more.
• The class is divided into two teams, which line up single file.
• A “Happy Face” card is added to the stack and the deck is shuffled and placed face down.
• The teacher draws the top card and shows it to the first person on one team who says the word in the TL. If the answer is incorrect, the whole class identifies the correct answer. The player goes to the end of his/her team’s line.
• When the “happy Face” card appears, the student whose turn it is gets a point for his/her team. The deck is reshuffled.
• The first team to five points wins.

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Hold it up
• Two identical sets of flashcards that feature the numbers or words to be taught are needed for this game.
• Each set of flashcards should be placed face down on a desk or chair in front of the classroom.
• Two children are chosen to come to the front of the room, and each is to stand behind one of the sets of flashcards. The teacher then calls out a word in the TL. The pupils must look through their respective piles and hold up that number.
• The first child to hold up the correct number gets to play again.
• Another student is selected to compete against the winner, and so on. Ten minutes is ample time for this activity.

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I have __, Who has ___
• Teacher must prepare cards carefully in advance as follows:
o Each card has “I have” and a vocabulary word in the TL on the top half.
o On the bottom half the card has “Who has” and a different vocabulary word pictured or in English.
o The cards “chain” so that eventually they circle back to the beginning.
o In these examples, imagine the top in the TL:


I have Dog

I have Cat

I have Horse

I have Cow

I have Duck

I have Hen

Who has Cat?

Who has Horse?

Who has Cow?

Who has Duck?

Who has Hen?

Who has Dog?

o The set should contain enough cards so that every student will get one to three cards.
o Be creative: if the vocab list isn’t long enough, tweak the way it’s used: for ex weather (in Nice it's cold what's the weather in Paris?)
• Shuffle the cards, and distribute them all. If students have more than one card, each student should make sure than his/her cards don’t connect.
• Teacher begins by starting a stopwatch and calling out “Who has” and one of the words (in English). (I borrowed a stopwatch from the PE teachers until I got my own—sometimes one of the students has a stopwatch feature on his/her watch).
• The student who has the TL for that first word reads their card: “J’ai chien. Qui a cat?” (Tengo perro. Quien tiene cat?).
• The next student reads their card.
• The object is to get through the whole set as quickly as possible.
• I have multiple sections, and make it into a competition—each class period get three attempts (and we trade cards in between each round).
• If you plan carefully enough, you can make each set the same number of cards (thirty, let’s say) and have the class attempt to beat their past times (works instead of competing among sections)
• After the class learns how to use the cards, use the sets in groups so each kid has 5 or 6 cards each. They really get lots of vocab practice.

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Listen and Draw
• Have students fold paper in fourths then number the squares 1-4 (or 1-8 if you use the back too)
• Say (in the TL) “Number One. I like apples. “ or something like that using a vocabulary word in a simple context.
• The students draw a representation of the word you used.
• Repeat until all squares are filled, then check the answers by having the students tell you what the word for each number was (in the TL, of course).

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Listen and Show
• Find or draw pictures of all the vocabulary for a unit on flashcards. Once they have “learned” all the words, shuffle the pictures and pass them out so that each student has one or more words. If there are not enough for the whole class, have some duplicates so that each student has at least one card.
• Say one of the words in the TL. The student who has that card holds it up.
• This is a quick moving practice.
• Once they know the words pretty well, kids may take turns calling the words, or the kid whose word is called shows the picture then quickly calls another word.
• Another variant is to give each student (or small groups of students) a complete set of small pictures. Every student or group must hold up a picture after you say each word.

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Name games
• The classic game for learning names is as follows:
o The first student introduces him/herself “Je m’appelle Pierre.” (“Me llamo Juan”)
o The next student must say the previous student’s name, then introduce him/herself
o The third student says both previous names, then his/her own. And so on.
o I usually make the first four students name everyone after we’ve gone all the way around.
o After we’re done, I like to do a check to see how they’ve learned:
-Silently, they have to line up in alphabetical order.
• Another game for learning/practicing names is a ball toss
o Using a soft ball, have students toss the ball to a student while calling that student’s name.
o If the name was wrong, the student immediately tosses the ball back, saying nothing.
o If the name was correct, the student calls another name and tosses the ball to that student.

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Pass the bag
• Put pictures of the vocabulary words in a bag
• Students pass the bag while counting to ten in the TL.
• Student who has the bag on ten reaches in, then pulls out a picture and says the word in the TL.
• Vary it by changing the number, or playing music and stopping it randomly. The student who has the bag when the music stops pulls out an item.

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Pass the board (which can be played quietly)
• Students are in groups (4-5) with one whiteboard & dry erase marker for each group.
• One student in each group has the board & marker.
• You call out vocab word, sentence, etc.
• Player writes it in TL and holds it up, you give thumbs up or down. If thumb down, player passes board to next team member who (without erasing wrong answer) makes another attempt at the answer and holds it up for your thumbs up or down.
• Team who first gets thumbs up gets a point. (But I wait until every team has the correct answer to move to next question).
• Boards get erased and passed to next player in the group for next question.

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Password (for more advanced level) / Taboo
• Students draw a word from a hat, and then must get their partner to say that word. They cannot say that word in their clues, but they can talk around it, give clues, etc.

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Le Pauvre/Pobrecito/99
• This game practices numbers, and is played with a standard deck of cards.
• Students play in groups of four or five. Each group gets a deck of card. Each player gets five euros/chips/markers. The goal is to have the most markers at the end.
• Students take turns dealing. Each player is dealt four cards, and the remaining cards are placed face down in the middle.
• The student to the left of the dealer begins, and play begins in a clockwise direction.
• The player lays his/her card and announces the total sum in the stack. So the first player simply announces the number on his/her card. The second player adds the value of the card he/she lays and announces the total (in the TL of course). And so on. However, there are some twists:
o Cards are valued as follows: Ace, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 are face value
o If an eight is laid, the play reverses direction, and the total doesn’t change
o If a nine is laid, the next player is skipped.
o If a ten is laid, the ten are SUBTRACTED from the total
o The Jack and Queen are ten points.
o A King automatically brings the total to 99.
o I post all these card values on the board whenever we play.
• After laying a card and announcing the total, the player picks up a card from the draw pile. Students should always have four cards in their hand.
• THE MARKERS: The object in each round is to reach 100 without going over. The player who makes the pile go over 100 has to give the previous player a marker. If a player says a number in English, a marker is taken away from that student by the teacher.
• Once 100 is reached and the marker paid, the play pile begins again. The game is over when the draw pile is empty and all cards have been played out of the students’ hands. The player with the most markers at that point wins.

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Pictionary
• Students are in teams.
• One student is given (or pulls from a hat) a vocabulary word.
• That player then attempts to draw a picture for that word, while his/her teammates attempt to guess the word. If they get it, the team scores a point.
• If the team hasn’t guessed within a set time limit, the other team gets a chance to guess. If they get it, they can “steal” the point.
• Either way, the other team now takes a turn drawing and guessing.
• As the rounds continue, each team member takes a turn drawing,

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Scattergories
• Students are in small teams.
• Announce five alphabet letters.
• Each teams lists as many TL words beginning with each letter as they can.
• Once time is up, each team scores one point for each correct word they have. They score five points for any word that no other team listed. (Alternatively, they get no points for words other teams have, and ONLY get points for words they were the only team to list).
• You can limit it to particular categories (ex. Food, animals, etc.)
• Another variant:
o Groups have a sheet with the whole alphabet and try to come up with a word that begins with each letter of the alphabet within a category.

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Snake Game
• Create simple game boards in a single path. The squares have pictures (or English words) and vocabulary words. For game pieces, you can use scraps of paper, different color bingo chips, buttons, whatever you can dig up. You will also need one die for each board. I make enough boards for every two students.
• Each student rolls the die, and may advance that many stops along the path. I make them count out their move using French numbers.
• When they arrive at a square, they jump forwards or back to the matching square (if they land on a picture, they jump to the name, and vice versa)
• To win, they must land on Fin by exact count. They get three tries. If, on the third turn, they have still not rolled an exact entry, they move back the number of squares on the die, then jump to the matching square.

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Snap and Clap game
• Each student is assigned a vocabulary word
• Students sit in a circle and may or may not have their words on cards in front of them, visible to the others.
• The class gets a rhythm going: slap slap, clap clap, snap snap (the slap is on their knees if sitting on the floor, or on the desk if in seats, the clap is clapping hands, and the snaps are the fingers, first right hand, second left hand)
• Once the beat is established, one student begins the task by saying his/her own word while snapping the right hand, then another word on the left snap,
• The student who has THAT word must catch the beat on the next snap. If he/she doesn’t say his word on the next snap, he/she is out.
• The beat can be slowed down or sped up to meet the class’s ability.

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Spelling Bee – Flashcard practice
• I don’t actually use this with spelling, but that’s the traditional format…
• Divide the class into two teams, which line up on each side of the room, single file.
• Present a flashcard to the first student in line on one side.
• If that student gives the correct answer, he/she goes to the end of the line.
• If the student gives an incorrect answer, he/she sits down in his/her seat, and the flashcard is shown to the first player in the other line.
• Once a correct answer is given, the next card is shown to the first student in the other line.
• Once there are only a few players standing, you can make one line and play to last player standing. (I usually quit with three or four left--and give them all candy).
• The students at their seats should have something to do—I have them write out the correct answer for the item they missed, then work on homework, or write all the missed items, or something…Otherwise they get very restless while your best students just keep playing—the ones who least need the practice!

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Scavenger Hunt
• Classic
o Students are in small groups
o Each group gets a list of items, in the TL.
o Then they try to find every item on their list
o The first team to collect all the items and return, wins. Or, at a set time, all groups return, and whoever has the most items on their list wins.
• Map:
o Place target vocabulary—objects or flashcards with pictures—around playground or classroom
o Students get a map, then write the words (in TL) on the map wherever the item is located
o Variation – students get a limited list, only mark the location of THOSE items

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Simon Says (Jacquot Dit)
• Teacher calls out commands in the TL:
o Simon says “touch your nose”
o Simon says “show me a pencil”
• Sometimes the teacher says “Simon says” but sometimes the teacher just says the command,
• The students are only supposed to obey the commands when “Simon Says”
• Can be used to practice command forms, body parts, prepositions, etc.

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Spoons
• Make a deck of cards using vocabulary words your students should know.
• The vocabulary should be in sets of four (four foods, four clothing items, four classroom items, …) Each card only has one word, but the deck should have several sets in it.
• Players play in groups of 4-6.
• In the middle, the group places four pencils/pens/spoons—one fewer than the number of students playing in the group.
• Dealer shuffles, then deals four cards per player. Everyone looks at their cards.
• Dealer takes the top card from the remaining pile, looks at it. The dealer must then pass a card to his/her left. That player looks at the new card, and passes a card. Meanwhile the dealer has taken another card and passes another card. Once you get going, the cards are constantly moving.
• Once a player has all four cards from a set, he/she takes one of the items from the middle. Play continues if he/she was sneaky enough.
• If a player notices that someone has taken one of the items, he/she also takes one.
• The last player to notice or grab loses the round.
• The deck can also be used for “Go fish” or “Old Maid” type games.
• Geography variant: Card sets are based on countries where the TL is spoken
o One card has the name of the country in the TL
o One has the flag
o One has the capital city
o One has the adjective of nationality in the TL

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TPR movement with time:
• Post digital or traditional clocks showing various times around the room.
• Say times out loud and have the students point to the appropriate clock.
• Pick a student, then say a time and have the student go to that clock. Repeat until all the students are standing around the room.
• Ask the students what times are in various places.
• Point to a clock and have the students tell you the time
• Alternatively, ask questions like what time is on the door/chalkboard/TV, etc.
• Break them into groups: girls go to 3:30, boys to 4:45
• Blonds go to 2:15, brown hair to 5:20, and redheads to 10:45
• This can obviously be used with other sets of vocabulary too.

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Verb/Grammar Games


Battleship
• Students each receive two papers with 20 x 20 grids.
• The rows and columns on the grid are labeled in various ways (see below). The classic game has letters for the rows and numbers for the columns.
• On one of the grids, each places five ships – one that covers five spaces, one four, two three, and one two. This grid shows the placement of their own ships and should remain hidden from the other player.
• Once both players have placed their ships, play begins.
• The first player guesses a grid location (ex. B-5).
• If the other player has that square colored in, he/she says “Hit” (and the guesser colors in the block on the second grid page). If the square is blank, he/she says “Miss” (and the guesser puts an X in the square). If a player has guessed all of the squares for a ship, the other player says “Hit and Sink” because that ship has been sunk.
• The other player then takes a turn guessing a location.
• The first player to sink all five of the other player’s ships wins.
• Grid ideas:
o ABC on the side, numbers on the top (Player calls B-5 to guess location)
o Pronouns and nouns down the side, infinitives along the top (Player calls Marie chante to guess location)
o Pronouns/Nouns with form of “to be” on the side, adjectives along the top (adjective must agree in gender and number to guess the spot)

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Conjugation Game
• Split the class into two teams.
• Give the verb, for example ir in the preterite.
• The first person on Team One gives the yo form, the second the form, etc. If the team completes the whole conjugation they receive 1 pt per correct form given (6 pts.) and 3 bonus points for doing the complete conjugation. If the team misses on the third form, they receive 2 points for getting the first two forms correct and then Team Two starts the conjugation (of the same verb) from the first form.
• It goes back and forth until one teams does the whole conjugation.
• This game depends a lot on listening so everyone pays attention. Students goodnaturedly boo a teammate if the verb has already said by the other team and he missed it because he wasn't paying attention.

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Conjugation Scramble
• Split the class into groups of 3 or 4 and a six sided die (singular of dice) for each group.
• Tell the kids to clear off their desks except for each kid has a sheet of notebook paper and ONE PEN per group. All other pens and pencils are put on the floor.
• Now for the fun. I write about 6-12 verbs on the board.
• When you say go, one kid in each group starts rolling until he rolls a six (just a random number). Once he gets a 6, he picks up the one and only pen and starts to conjugate the verb in whatever tense you've been studying.
• BUT, while he is conjugating, the next kid is rolling the die at the same time... the moment she gets a 6, she grabs the pen from that first kid and she starts conjugating but while she's conjugating, the next kid is rolling to try to get a 6 in order to get the pen.
• It keeps going in a circle like that until one kid has finished all verbs. The game moves fast and you always have one kid rolling and one kid writing and one or two kids eager for their turn to roll or write.

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Dice game for verb conjugation
• Use 2 dice (preferably of 2 different colors).
• On the board, number from 1 to 6 in two columns, A and B. Under the A column, put a different infinitive by each number. Under B, put different subjects.
• The first die determines the verb and the second determines the subject.
• One team rolls the dice. The person who rolled must give the correct verb form.
• If they say the form correctly they win the total they shook on the dice. If they don't say the form correctly they get nothing.
• Doubles gets the student another turn, but 3 doubles in a row and they lose all points from their turn.

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Oral conjugation practice
• I have all students in the class stand up and we go around the room conjugating the verb. If the student can’t give an answer, they have to sit down, and the next person must say the form that student should have been able to say. (they can’t count ahead unless they’re sure everyone ahead of them knows the answers)
• The trick is that the person whoever has the 3rd person plural form also has to sit down!
• To prevent the obvious boredom that may occur when it's not your turn (and you might “tune out” or be prone to talking!) I also make anyone sit down who doesn't know which pronoun we're on!
• The winner is the last one standing. This is quick for extra minutes at the end of class.

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Pronoun & verb card practice
• First you have to make laminated pronoun cards for the language. (Je, tu, il, elle, on, Marie et Paul, nous, vous, etc)- you can be creative with these (e.g. Jennifer Lopez et moi). There need to be a set of these for each table. I divide the class into groups of 4. Pass out a set of pronoun cards to each table, then give a different verb to each table (aimer, etre, aller, whatever). They practice conjugating their verb for 5 minutes (or less). They have to make sure everyone in their group can conjugate the verb, by quizzing each other.
• Now the game begins. Each table is playing against the others. You are the scorekeeper at the board. You then start with first person at table one. Hold up a subject pronoun. Tell them, the verb is "demander". They have to answer the correct form of the verb (e.g. nous demandons). I prefer to have them write it on a whiteboard & hold it up, but you could try it orally-have the student spell out the answer (in the TL of course). If that person is right, the team gets 1 point.
• Now you move to person 1 at Table two. The verb is aller., The pronoun is Jennifer Lopez et moi. Person 1 at table two must supply the correct answer. If he can't, no point is earned. You move to the next table. Believe it or not, the kids LOVE this game, especially when there is a weak kid at the table. You can use it for different tenses, different conjugations of verbs, what ever you want. Keep going around the room until each person at each table has had at least one turn.

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Verb Conjugation Relay Race #1
• The class is divided into teams.
• Each team has a container filled with infinitives (each team has the same verbs.)
• The first student from each team takes an infinitive (on a slip of paper) from the container, runs to the board and conjugates it as quickly as he/she can.
• I give a thumbs up or down. If it is correct, the student runs to the back of the room to deposit the word in another container. If it is wrong, the verb is put back in the "pot".
• The first student goes to the back of the line and the second student takes over, etc.
• The first team to complete all the infinitives wins

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Verb Conjugation Relay Race #2
• There are many variations of this game. It can be done on paper or on the board, or with individual or group slates/whiteboards.
• The class is divided into teams. The players take turns. Only the player whose turn it is may write a form. There is no talking among the team members during play.
• If you are playing at the board, have the remaining players wait in line a few feet back from the board. If you are working in groups at the seats, the paper or white board is passed around or across the row, or whatever.
• Each team may only have one piece or chalk, pen, or marker.
• Teacher calls out a verb in English.
o The first player writes the infinitive in the TL, then passes the chalk, pen, etc to the next player.
o The next player writes the “je/yo/I” form.
o The third player writes the “tu/tú” form.
o Etc.
• If there is a mistake, a player may correct it, but that takes his/her turn and he/she can only correct one error on that turn.
• The first team to have the correct series gets 5 points (if you have 5 teams), the next gets 4, etc.

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Verb Conjugation Timed Race
• The players are in groups of six or fewer.
• Across the top of the board, write six infinitives.
• The players from one team line up under the infinitives. Each player has a piece of chalk.
• Teacher says “Go” and begins a stopwatch.
• All players write the “je/yo/I” form for the verb they are standing under, then shift to the right. The player on the right end must run to the left end of the board.
• All players write the “tu/tú” form of the new verb and move on
• At the end of two minutes (or whatever time works for your class) teacher says “Stop”
• Count the number of correct forms, that is the team’s score.
• Erase all the forms. And the next team lines up.
• Because they got to watch the first team and learn from their mistakes, the second team only gets a minute and fifty seconds. The third team gets a minute forty, etc.

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Verb tic tac toe
• Draw a tic tac toe board and put different subjects in the boxes. (I, you-singular, he, she, one, we, you-plural, they (male), they (female) – or whatever group of pronouns in the TL gives you nine boxes)
• Student draws a verb from a hat, then gives the form of the verb for the box he/she wants
• If a student gets the appropriate form correct s/he gets the box.
• The team that gets tic tac toe first wins.
• It can also be used for a quick practice when learning a new irregular verb
• Another variant has three pronouns across the top of the grid and three infinitives down the side. Teams fill in the box by giving the appropriate verb form

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Review/General


Baseball / Beisbol
• Class is divided into two teams.
• Designate places in the classroom for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd base, as well as “home plate.”
• Student who is at-bat rolls a dice.
o 1 = single (easy question, right answer advances to first base)
o 2 = double (harder question, correct answer, “batter” goes to second base)
o 3 = triple (harder question)
o 4 = homerun (very hard question)
o 5 = foul, roll again
o 6 = ball, roll again
• Wrong answer is an out. 3 outs mean the other team comes up to bat and any players stranded do not score.
• Correct answer means players proceed around the bases as in the real game.

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Basketball
• Class is divided into teams of two–four players. Each team has a whiteboard & marker.
• Place a basket (trash can or box) on one side of the room. Mark off one point, two point, and three point spots to shoot from.
• Ask a question, team writes answer on board. When all teams show answers, if they have correct answer they get a chance to shoot. One player comes up and decides where to shoot from. If they make the shot, their team gets that number of points. If the shooter misses, no points. If the answer was incorrect, no points. All team members must take turns shooting.

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Bomb Game
• Game board is a grid with numbers across the top and letters down the side. In each square of the grid is a card or cover with a picture hidden behind it.
• Students are in teams, which take turns answering questions. If they get the answer correct, they pick a square on the grid to reveal (state number and letter in TL)
• The picture revealed determines the number of points scored for the question:
o A flag = +5 points (2 on grid)
o A star = +2 points
o A boat = +1 point
o A grenade = -1 point
o A bomb = -2 points
o An atomic bomb = team’s point total goes to zero (2 on grid)
• The number of stars, boats, grenades, and bombs depends on how big a grid you are playing.
• Even if the teams are uneven in language skill, they have equal chance. Sometimes the team with the most correct answers loses.
• The game can be played with any type of questions: conjugation, culture, vocabulary, grammar, …
• Grid can be made on overhead, board, magnet board, pocket board…. Pictures can be on the backs of the cards, and thus easily shuffled for the next time the game is played. On overheads, shapes can be laid on the glass, then covered with checkers or small post-it notes.

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“Family” Feud
• Divide the class into two teams.
• Have one member of each team come up to the front and face each other across a desk, table, cart, stool, …
• Ask a question. The first player to buzz in or slap their hand down on the desk/table… gets a chance to answer. If they are correct, their team gets the point. If they are incorrect, the other team may talk among the team to come up with an answer. If they get it right, they get the point. If not, just explain the right answer, nobody gets points.
• Bring up the next member of each team.

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Jeopardy
• Make a grid five or six across and five down. This may be on a transparency, pocket board, or possibly the chalkboard. (You can also set up a “challenge board” on quia.com)
• Label the grid with point values (smallest at the top, most and the bottom)
• Label categories across the top (can also be infinitives)
• In each square, put a picture/English word/subject pronoun/… (Students should not see these as you are preparing the grid)
• Cover the squares.
• Students are in teams. Team members take turns answering. Teams take turns selecting a column and point value. The member whose turn it is must give the answer with no help from their team (one variant of the game allows the team to confer).
• If the answer is correct, the team gets the points. If the answer is incorrect, you may allow another team to “steal” the points or have the whole class say the correct answer.
• I prefer a variant where each team has a whiteboard, and all teams answer all questions. When I say “time,” they hold up their answers. I award full points to every team with the correct answer, half points for misspelled (but otherwise correct) answers.
• If you have $50 in the budget, the “Eggspert” system for sale by vendors lets you have teams buzz in or can randomly select teams to answer. My students love it.

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Speed Scrabble
• Put students into groups of no more than 8 to 10 people.
• Spread Scrabble tiles face down in the center of the group.
• Each student should choose 7 tiles, face down.
• When the teacher gives the signal, everyone flips their 7 tiles over and begins arranging them into words in the target language (as one would on a Scrabble board) as fast as they can. (Note: NO Scrabble board is needed for this. Each student simply lays his or her tiles on the floor and begins connecting them into words like one would in a crossword puzzle.)
• When any player has legally used ALL of his or her tiles, that person shouts "Draw!" and selects ONE new tile (not seven). Everyone else gets to draw one new tile too, even if they have not used all of their tiles at that point. (Note: Unlike "real" Scrabble, in this game, you do not get to draw a new tile until all 7 of your old tiles have been used, or until someone else shouts "Draw!")
• Players may rearrange the tiles on their personal Scrabble "boards" in order to incorporate the new tile.
• Students continue playing in this fashion until all tiles have been taken from the center of the circle.
• When all tiles have been emptied from the center of the circle, students must count up the number of tiles you they still have that they have not successfully incorporated into their personal Scrabble "board." The person with the lowest score wins.
• If you don't have enough Scrabble games in the target language to make this work, you could use it as a learning center activity, or could make your own Scrabble tiles with a word processor and simply photocopy sets of them for each student.

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Spin the bottle (no, not that version)
• Review questions are written on cards and placed face down on a stack.
• Students sit in a circle (you may want to have multiple circles if you have large classes).
• Spin a plastic bottle in the middle of the circle.
• The student at the bottom of the bottle (when it stops) picks up the top card and asks the question. The student at the top of the bottle has to answer.
• If she/he answers correctly the card is removed, if not, it is “cut” back into the stack. The student who missed the answer must also pay some price (write the correct answer ten times, or something).
• Play continues until no cards are left or time is up.

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Stump the Chumps— Quiz the other team
• Divide the class in half. Pick a student to keep score if there is an uneven number.
• Set up six chairs in the front of the room -- three for each team.
• For each "round", three students from each team occupy these seats. They may bring their textbooks and notes with them to use ONLY while formulating questions -- NOT while answering them.
• The Team A players put their books under their seats. EACH player from Team B asks Team A a vocabulary question. Any player from Team A can answer. Each Team A player can decide if the team will receive a 3 point or a 5 point question.
o 3 point questions: (TL to English -- easier) "¿Qué significa _____?"
o 5 point questions: (English to TL -- harder) "¿Cómo se dice _____?"
• Team A is only given one attempt to answer the question. If the answer is wrong, proceed to the next question (the correct answer is revealed at the end of the round, but no points are awarded for it at that point). If none of the three Team A players wants to venture a guess, then any student from the Team A side of the room (and THEY can access their book and notes) may volunteer the answer for 1 point. This gets ALL the students looking through their books constantly -- looking not only for the answer, but also for possible questions to pose when it is their turn.
• Then Team B puts away their books, and it is their turn to answer the questions from Team A.
• At the end of the round, the six players return to their seats and the next 3 students from each side come up and become the "players" for the next round. This way everybody gets a turn to pose and to answer a question, and no one student is ever completely on the spot alone.

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Authentic Game


Boules/Pétanque
Basic Rules
• Play with two teams of one to four players per team.! Each player uses two or three boules (heavy balls, distinguished by color or design from the other players' boules).! A coin toss can decide who goes first.
• The play area is decided and a small circle is drawn for the players to stand in as they throw. The first player stands in that circle and tosses the smaller cochonnet (or jack) ball about six to ten yards from the player circle.
• The first thrower attempts to throw his (or her) boule as close to the cochonnet as possible.
• The opposing team sends its first player to try to throw closer.
• Whichever team is now farthest from the cochonnet throws next. This continues, with the losing team throwing until they get a boule closer, or until they run out of boules.
• Once one team gets in the lead, the other team must throw until they get a ball closer or until they run out of boules. Do not alternate throws. If the throwing team gets a boule closer than any of the other team's boules, the other team starts throwing again. When the throwing team runs out of boules, the other team throws their remaining boules, attempting to score additional points
• Once all the boules are thrown, the winning team scores a point for every boule that is closer to the cochonnet than the opposing team's closest boule.
• The winner draws a new circle around the cochonnet, and starts from that point.!
• The game is over when one team accumulates 13 points.! A match has three games.

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Questions? Comments?  Email me at jrauschenberg@loganhocking.k12.oh.us

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